Sapien Valve Implantation

The Edwards Sapien valve, also known as the Sapien valve, is a collapsible valve that can be implanted without surgery to replace a defective heart valve. Sapien valves are used to replace defective pulmonary, aortic and mitral valves.  Performing a valve replacement can delay or even prevent the need for open heart surgery.

The pediatric heart specialists at Norton Children’s Heart Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, are experienced and trained to implant the Sapien valve through a 1/4-inch incision, usually in the groin area or neck.

Under the supervision of specially trained pediatric cardiac anesthesiologists, your child will be asleep as the physician threads a catheter (a small, thin tube) through a large blood vessel to the site of the defective valve.

The collapsed Sapien valve is attached onto a balloon catheter. Once at the precise location, the doctor inflates the balloon to expand the valve. The new valve stays in place and the doctor removes the balloon along with the catheter.

The procedure usually takes three to four hours, and your child likely will spend one night at Norton Children’s Hospital following the procedure.

After the procedure, most children can go back to school within three days. Your child will not be able to participate in sports for at least six weeks following the procedure.

Norton Children’s Heart Institute is the leading provider of pediatric heart care in Louisville and Southern Indiana.  We have experienced interventional cardiologists that can discuss how best to treat your child with a defective heart valve.

Norton Children’s has a network of outreach diagnostic and treatment services conveniently located throughout Kentucky and Southern Indiana.

Why Choose Norton Children’s Heart Institute

The Adult Congenital Heart Association has recognized Norton Children's Heart Institute for its expertise treating adult congenital heart disease.

  • Norton Children’s Hospital has been a pioneer in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery, performing Kentucky’s first pediatric heart transplant in 1986 and becoming the second site in the United States to perform an infant heart transplant.
  • The American Board of Thoracic Surgery has certified our cardiothoracic surgeons in congenital heart surgery.
  • The Adult Congenital Heart Association has accredited Norton Children’s Heart Institute’s Adult Congenital Heart Program as the only comprehensive care center in Kentucky and Indiana treating adults born with a heart defect.
  • More than 5,000 children a year visit Norton Children’s Heart Institute for advanced heart care.
  • Norton Children’s Heart Institute has offices across Kentucky and Southern Indiana to bring quality pediatric heart care closer to home.
  • The Jennifer Lawrence Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) at Norton Children’s Hospital is the largest dedicated CICU in Kentucky, equipped with 17 private rooms and the newest technology available for heart care.
Heart – 2929

Norton Children’s Heart Institute

Call for an appointment

(502) 629-2929


Request an Appointment Online

Norton Children’s Heart Institute’s Owensboro location treats children with heart defects close to home

It all started with a routine ultrasound. Chelsea Rusher, who was pregnant with her son, Baylor, was getting a 20-week anatomy scan. During the scan, the provider noticed a complication: It appeared the baby would […]

Read Full Story

Born with half a heart, local boy may have biggest heart of all

It’s not a matter of how much heart you have, but how much heart you give. That is true for Johnathan Young. He was born with half of a working heart. Johnathan, age 11, is […]

Read Full Story

Healthy blood pressure in children differs from adults

The commonly known “goal” for healthy blood pressure in adults is 120/80, but this guideline does not apply to many children. “What is considered a healthy reading for adults could indicate an unhealthy blood pressure […]

Read Full Story

Send Valentine’s Day cheer to children at Norton Children’s facilities

Community members have an opportunity to send children who are patients at Norton Children’s facilities a Valentine’s Day greeting. The greetings can be selected at NortonChildrens.com/Valentine. From Feb. 1 to 10, 2022, people can choose […]

Read Full Story

How to prevent heart disease in children

In many cases, preventing heart disease in children can be accomplished with lifestyle changes. Preventable heart disease in children is increasing, likely tied to a widespread increase in childhood obesity. According to the Centers for […]

Read Full Story
Related Stories

Norton Children’s Heart Institute’s Owensboro location treats children with heart defects close to home

It all started with a routine ultrasound. Chelsea Rusher, who was pregnant with her son, Baylor, was getting a 20-week anatomy scan. During the scan, the provider noticed a complication: It appeared the baby would […]

Read Full Story

Born with half a heart, local boy may have biggest heart of all

It’s not a matter of how much heart you have, but how much heart you give. That is true for Johnathan Young. He was born with half of a working heart. Johnathan, age 11, is […]

Read Full Story

Healthy blood pressure in children differs from adults

The commonly known “goal” for healthy blood pressure in adults is 120/80, but this guideline does not apply to many children. “What is considered a healthy reading for adults could indicate an unhealthy blood pressure […]

Read Full Story

Send Valentine’s Day cheer to children at Norton Children’s facilities

Community members have an opportunity to send children who are patients at Norton Children’s facilities a Valentine’s Day greeting. The greetings can be selected at NortonChildrens.com/Valentine. From Feb. 1 to 10, 2022, people can choose […]

Read Full Story

How to prevent heart disease in children

In many cases, preventing heart disease in children can be accomplished with lifestyle changes. Preventable heart disease in children is increasing, likely tied to a widespread increase in childhood obesity. According to the Centers for […]

Read Full Story

Search our entire site.