Norton Children’s Rheumatology

Norton Children’s pediatric rheumatology cares for a number of conditions affecting the bones, muscles and tissues. Our board-certified and fellowship-trained pediatric rheumatologists have the experience to provide comprehensive care for the full spectrum of pediatric rheumatic diseases.

When should my child see a rheumatologist?

Rheumatic diseases can affect each child differently. A child can experience many symptoms or just a few. Some children experience symptoms for several months, while others may have symptoms only for a few days. If your child experiences symptoms, talk to your pediatrician about whether seeing a rheumatologist is right for your child.

Symptoms and concerns that may indicate the need to see a rheumatologist:

  • Pain or weakness in the muscles, ligaments, tendons and bones. Your child may not be able to describe the pain or may be used to the constant presence of pain.
  • Your child may choose to avoid activities he or she enjoys because he or she feels tired or sore.
  • Fever
  • Suspected connective tissue disorder
  • Suspected autoimmune disorder (where the immune system attacks healthy cells)
  • Swelling and stiffness. Stiffness and pain may come and go, but most often these symptoms do not go away. Joint pain, swelling and stiffness usually are worse in the morning or after laying down or being inactive.
  • Protecting or guarding a joint. Your child may limp or avoid using a certain joint. He or she may not be able to use the full range of motion in a joint.
  • Skin rashes
  • Thickening and tightening of the skin

Coordinated care for rheumatic diseases

We work with providers across the Norton Children’s network to provide coordinated care, including:

  • Behavioral services
  • Imaging
  • Medical
  • Surgical
  • Occupational and physical therapy

Collaboration with UofL Physicians for your child’s care

We work with providers from UofL Physicians to offer highly skilled care for your child. Norton Children’s Hospital serves as the primary pediatric teaching facility for the University of Louisville School of Medicine. These doctors are professors and active researchers helping to advance medical care through clinical research and education.

The Norton Children’s difference

With a 125-year presence in Louisville, Norton Children’s is a leader in pediatric care across Kentucky and Southern Indiana, providing an expanded footprint that includes:

Norton Children’s offers specialized programs and services, including:

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the University of Louisville, and the Addison Jo Blair Cancer Care Center, which is one of the oldest oncology programs in the U.S. and continuously accredited by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.

  • Norton Children’s Heart & Vascular Institute, affiliated with the University of Louisville, a pioneer in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. Norton Children’s heart transplant surgeons performed Kentucky’s first heart transplant in a newborn in 1986, making the hospital the second site in the United States for infant transplants. Norton Children’s Hospital will be home to the Jennifer Lawrence Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (expected completion in 2019).
  • Pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, including a Level 3 epilepsy center
  • Orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation
  • The Wendy Novak Diabetes Center
Rheumatology – 5437

Norton Children’s Rheumatology

Call for information

(502) 629-KIDS

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