Clinical Research at Norton Children’s

Providing children with quality health care requires more than office visits and hospital stays. The specialists with Norton Children’s, in partnership with the University of Louisville, are broadening knowledge of pediatric diseases, discovering new therapies and ultimately improving care.

Our pediatric specialists are pursuing clinical and translational research that brings new treatments and improved therapies to children.

See our endowed chairs.

Norton Children’s Research Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, is made up of dedicated and experienced clinical researchers, coordinators, nurses, pharmacists and other staff. Our team conducts patient-oriented research to improve health care and the safety of medicines and devices in children from birth to adulthood, and includes all races and genders.

Our pediatric specialists conduct clinical pharmacology research and device research studies, with locations at Norton Children’s Hospital and the Novak Center for Children’s Health. These locations allow inpatients and outpatients to participate in trials, as well as provide education and training in research initiatives for the medical providers of tomorrow. Hundreds of children each year participate in studies right here at home.

Pediatric research is conducted in a multitude of areas. If you are interested in research trials available, talk to your child’s physician about options.

Inpatient clinical trial studies conducted at Norton Children’s Hospital include:

  • Antibiotic studies
  • Cardiology studies
  • Critical care studies
  • Infectious diseases studies
  • Kidney studies
  • Neonatal intensive care studies

Outpatient clinical trial studies conducted at the Novak Center for Children’s Health include the following conditions:

  • Autism
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Epilepsy
  • Genetic conditions
  • Hematologic conditions
  • Infectious diseases
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • Multiple sclerosis

See all open research trials at Norton Children’s Research Institute.

Did You Know?

  • Of prescribed medicines given to children, 70% to 80% are not approved for use in children by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Most have been tested only in adults.
  • Norton Children’s Research Institute works with drug companies and federal agencies to make sure medications and medical treatments are safe for your child.
  • The research team works closely with your child’s physician throughout the study to ensure that your child receives the best and safest care possible.
  • Some of our studies already have made positive changes in the way that we prescribe medications and provide care to children.
  • We have a research nurse on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In clinical trials, patient safety is always our first priority.
  • It is often thought that clinical trials are mainly for people who have no other option. In fact, clinical trials can be an additional option to help you and your child through their medical care.

 

Research

Support Research at Norton Children’s

Research at Norton Children’s is made possible thanks to the generosity of donors who wish to support important advances in pediatric health.
Donate today


Or call (502) 629-8060

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