Pediatric Sleep Medicine at Norton Children’s

Sleep disorders in children are more common than you may think. Norton Children’s Pediatric Sleep Center offers sleep studies for children of all ages, from newborns to age 18, experiencing sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia or other conditions.

Why see a pediatric sleep specialist?

Sleep is vital to a child’s health — it directly impacts mental and physical development. Children who do not get enough quality sleep may become irritable, have trouble focusing and experience learning and behavioral difficulties. Talk to your child’s primary care provider about any sleep disorder symptoms your child may have, including:

  • Behavioral issues
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • High blood pressure
  • Leg twitches
  • Nightmares
  • Poor school performance
  • Sleep walking
  • Snoring, gasping for air during sleep

Your primary care provider may refer you to our sleep specialist to evaluate your child. This may include a performing pediatric sleep study.

Pediatric sleep study and evaluation

A pediatric sleep study is an afternoon or overnight test during which a child’s sleep is monitored by a sleep technologist in the pediatric sleep lab at Norton Women’s & Children’s Hospital. During the sleep study, a parent or guardian shares the room with the child to help him or her feel comfortable. The child sleeps in a comfortable bed or crib, and the parent has a separate bed. Each room has private restroom facilities, including a shower.

Our sleep technologists have specialized training to work with children. They are well-versed in the management of complex sleep disorders and have continuous unrestricted access to the sleep physician on call throughout the duration of a child’s sleep study.

During the study, electrodes are taped to the child’s head, face and chest, and worn while the child sleeps. These painless wires track sleep stages, breathing patterns, heart activity, oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and body movements, as well as other information.

A trained technologist continuously monitors the child and equipment throughout the study. After testing is complete, the data is analyzed by our fellowship-trained pediatric sleep medicine physician and a written evaluation is sent to the child’s referring physician.

Pediatric sleep tests available:

  • Baseline sleep study
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration
  • Mean sleep latency test
  • Actigraphy watch testing

Collaboration with UofL Physicians for your child’s care

We work with providers from UofL Physicians to provide highly skilled care for your child. Norton Children’s Hospital serves as the primary pediatric teaching facility for the University of Louisville School of Medicine. These doctors are professors and active researchers helping to advance medical care through clinical research and education.

The Norton Children’s difference

With a 125-year presence in Louisville, Norton Children’s is a leader in pediatric care across Kentucky and Southern Indiana, providing an expanded footprint that includes:

Norton Children’s offers specialized programs and services, including:

  • Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the University of Louisville, and the Addison Jo Blair Cancer Care Center, which is one of the oldest oncology programs continuously accredited by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.
  • Norton Children’s Heart & Vascular Institute, affiliated with the University of Louisville, a pioneer in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. Norton Children’s heart transplant surgeons performed Kentucky’s first heart transplant in a newborn in 1986, making the hospital the second site in the United States for infant transplants. Norton Children’s Hospital will be home to the Jennifer Lawrence Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (expected completion in 2019).
  • Pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, including a Level 4 epilepsy center
  • Orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation
  • The Wendy Novak Diabetes Center

 

Sleep medicine

Call for information

(502) 629-KIDS

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