Plan Your Visit

Norton Children’s Política de Visitante

Health Care Mask Requirements

A Kentucky executive order requires patients, visitors and employees to wear masks in patient care facilities such as hospitals and doctors’ offices beyond June 11, 2021. Norton Healthcare requires children ages 2 and older to wear masks in health care settings.

Important Information for All Visitors

  • All visitors must be 12 or older, unless a special exception is granted.
  • Anyone who is ill is asked to not visit or accompany patients.
  • If a visitor displays unsafe, threatening or aggressive behavior, or impedes care, intentionally or not, appropriate measures will be taken to protect our patients and staff.

Norton Children’s Visitor Policy

Norton Children's Inpatient

  • Primary caregivers: Up to two designated primary caregivers for the length of the admission. Primary caregivers must be age 18 or older unless they are the parents/guardians of the patient. Primary caregivers will have their fingerprints registered with the visitor management system so they can access the unit and visit the child at any time.
  • Secondary caregivers/visitors: Up to four designated secondary caregivers/visitors may visit between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. for the length of the child’s admission. Secondary caregivers/visitors may include siblings age 12 or older.
  • Only two individuals are allowed to be at the bedside at any given time. One must be 18 or older.
  • Pediatric patients who have pending COVID-19 tests or have tested positive for COVID-19 may have two designated visitors.
  • One clergy member may be designated for the length of the admission and may visit between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.
  • Caregivers/visitors will be required to successfully complete a health screening form daily and receive a visitor’s pass for the day.
  • Compassionate visitation exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Norton Children's Outpatient including Norton Children’s Medical Center (Emergency/Surgery/Testing)

  • No one under age 12 may accompany a patient for outpatient services.
  • Two visitors may accompany the pediatric patient.

Norton Children's Medical Group Doctor’s Offices

  • Two visitors may accompany the pediatric patient; one must be a parent or guardian

Norton Healthcare Adult Facilities

Adult Hospitals including their Outpatient Departments, Surgery and Emergency Departments

  • All adult hospital patients may have two visitors at a time, age 12 or older, 24/7.
  • During labor and delivery, you also may have a properly credentialed doula as part of your care team.
  • For patients in isolation:
    • Two visitors, age 12 or older, for most isolation patients, including those in COVID-19 isolation.
      • No visitor for patients who are on “continuous” aerosolizing therapies, including BiPAP and Vapotherm.
    • All visitors must strictly follow personal protective equipment (PPE) guidelines and must stay in the patient’s room throughout the visit.
    • All visitors must leave the room during any aerosolizing procedures.
  • Compassionate visitation exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Doctors’ Offices and Outpatient Medical Center Appointments for Adults, Including Norton Cancer Institute

Two visitors per adult patient.


Planning your visit to Norton Children’s can make a stressful time a little less difficult.

We’ve compiled helpful information for before, during and after your visit.

Remember, it’s OK to ask questions and raise concerns. If our providers slip into hospital lingo or otherwise aren’t clear — stop them and ask them to be clearer. Sometimes it’s helpful to bring a relative or friend along who may not be as overwhelmed to ask questions and understand the answers. That’s OK too.

Here are some answers to questions you may have about your child’s stay:

How Do I Politely Ask People to Wash Their Hands?

If a caregiver enters your child’s room and you didn’t see them use hand sanitizer or wash, remind them. They won’t be offended and will appreciate your desire to protect your child.

You have every reason to request that everyone who may have direct contact with your child wash or use sanitizer.

Since the Hospital Has Medications, Do I need to Bring My Child’s Prescriptions?

Bring a list. If you do bring medications to the hospital, take them home with you after a doctor or nurse has seen them.

Tell your child’s doctor if your child takes over-the-counter medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamins or herbal supplements.

Look at all medications before your child takes them. If a medication does not look like what your child usually takes, ask why. It may be a generic version or a different medication than normally ordered.

My Child Has Allergies. Whom Do I Tell?

Tell the doctors and nurses of any drug, food or environmental allergies your child has, including to latex.

Before any test or procedure, ask if it will require dyes or medications. Remind your doctor or nurse if your child has allergies to dyes or medications.

Once We’re Settled in a Room, Does My Child Need to Keep the Wristband On?

Yes. Make sure to keep your child’s hospital ID band on at all times. That is the best way for caregivers to identify your child.

Whom Do I Ask About Tests, Procedures and Results?

Ask your child’s doctor to explain the results of all tests and procedures. Ask what the results are and what they mean.

Whom Do I Talk to About My Child’s Surgery?

Your child’s surgeon should explain the benefits and risks of the planned procedure and discuss any other options.

Tell the surgeon, anesthesiologists and nurses if your child has ever had allergies or reactions to anesthesia.

Your child’s surgeon may mark the site on the body where your child is supposed to have surgery. This may help to reduce the chances of any confusion.

Does Everyone Wear a Badge?

Yes. Make yourself familiar with the members of your child’s health care team.

Hospital employees wear a photo identification badge that displays their name, title and department.

All guests will be required to obtain a wristband (parents/guardians) or a badge (other guests) before entering an inpatient unit. Daily health screenings also will be required for guests.

Question anyone you are not familiar with or who does not have an identification badge. Ask the person their name and to explain what role he or she has in your child’s care. Report anything suspicious to your child’s nurse.

Why Don’t the Electrical Outlets Have Covers?

All electrical outlets at Norton Children‘s Hospital are hospital-grade and childproof, and do not require outlet covers.

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