Plan Your Visit

For important updates to our visitor policy, please visit NortonHealthcare.com


Planning your visit to Norton Children’s can make a stressful time a little less difficult.

We’ve compiled helpful information for before, during and after your visit.

Remember, it’s OK to ask questions and raise concerns. If our providers slip into hospital lingo or otherwise aren’t clear — stop them and ask them to be clearer. Sometimes it’s helpful to bring a relative or friend along who may not be as overwhelmed to ask questions and understand the answers. That’s OK too.

Here are some answers to questions you may have about your child’s stay:

How Do I Politely Ask People to Wash Their Hands?

If a caregiver enters your child’s room and you didn’t see them use hand sanitizer or wash, remind them. They won’t be offended and will appreciate your desire to protect your child.

You have every reason to request that everyone who may have direct contact with your child wash or use sanitizer.

Since the Hospital Has Medications, Do I need to Bring My Child’s Prescriptions?

Bring a list. If you do bring medications to the hospital, take them home with you after a doctor or nurse has seen them.

Tell your child’s doctor if your child takes over-the-counter medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamins or herbal supplements.

Look at all medications before your child takes them. If a medication does not look like what your child usually takes, ask why. It may be a generic version or a different medication than normally ordered.

My Child Has Allergies. Whom Do I Tell?

Tell the doctors and nurses of any drug, food or environmental allergies your child has, including to latex.

Before any test or procedure, ask if it will require dyes or medications. Remind your doctor or nurse if your child has allergies to dyes or medications.

Once We’re Settled in a Room, Does My Child Need to Keep the Wristband On?

Yes. Make sure to keep your child’s hospital ID band on at all times. That is the best way for caregivers to identify your child.

Whom Do I Ask About Tests, Procedures and Results?

Ask your child’s doctor to explain the results of all tests and procedures. Ask what the results are and what they mean.

Whom Do I Talk to About My Child’s Surgery?

Your child’s surgeon should explain the benefits and risks of the planned procedure and discuss any other options.

Tell the surgeon, anesthesiologists and nurses if your child has ever had allergies or reactions to anesthesia.

Your child’s surgeon may mark the site on the body where your child is supposed to have surgery. This may help to reduce the chances of any confusion.

Does Everyone Wear a Badge?

Yes. Make yourself familiar with the members of your child’s health care team.

Hospital employees wear a photo identification badge that displays their name, title and department.

All guests will be required to obtain a wristband (parents/guardians) or a badge (other guests) before entering an inpatient unit. Daily health screenings also will be required for guests.

Question anyone you are not familiar with or who does not have an identification badge. Ask the person their name and to explain what role he or she has in your child’s care. Report anything suspicious to your child’s nurse.

Why Don’t the Electrical Outlets Have Covers?

All electrical outlets at Norton Children‘s Hospital are hospital-grade and childproof, and do not require outlet covers.

Plan Your Visit -5437

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