Prepare for your visit

You play an important role in your child’s care. Here are some things you can do to ensure a safe hospital stay for your child at Norton Children’s Hospital.

  • Ask questions

Speak up if you have concerns. It is OK to ask questions and expect answers that you can understand. Take a relative or friend with you if that will help you ask questions and understand the answers.

  • Medications

Know what medications your child takes, and bring a list of all of them to the hospital. Do not keep home medications with you at the hospital. Take all medications home after a doctor or nurse has seen them.

Tell your child’s doctor if your child takes over-the-counter medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamins or herbal supplements. Make certain doctors and nurses are aware of any drug, food or environmental allergies your child has, including to latex.

Look at all medications before your child takes them. If it does not look like what your child usually takes, ask why. It may be a generic version or a different medication than normally ordered.

Ask whether any test or procedure will require dyes or medications prior to testing. Remind your doctor or nurse if your child has any allergies to dyes or medications.

Make sure your child has a hospital ID band on at all times. That is the best way for caregivers to identify your child.

  • Tests

Make sure your child’s doctor explains the results of all tests and procedures. Ask what the results are and what they mean.

  • Surgery

Make sure you understand what will happen if your child needs surgery. Your child’s surgeon should explain the benefits and risks of the planned procedure and discuss any other options.

Tell the surgeon, anesthesiologists and nurses if your child has ever had allergies or reactions to anesthesia.

Your child’s surgeon may mark the site on the body where your child is supposed to have surgery. This may help to reduce the chances of any confusion.

  • Learn about your child’s condition and treatment

Don’t hesitate to remind caregivers of any problems your child may have, such as allergies or medical conditions.

Make certain you are familiar with all members of your child’s health care team. Hospital employees wear a photo identification badge that displays their name, title and department.

Question anyone you are not familiar with or who does not have an identification badge. Ask who that person is and what role he or she has in your child’s care. Report anything suspicious to your child’s nurse.

  • Hand-washing

Hand-washing is essential in preventing the spread of infection in hospitals. Consider asking all individuals who may have direct contact with your child if they have washed their hands.

  • Home care

Make sure you know what to do for your child when you get home. Ask about any changes in medications or activity levels before you leave the hospital.

  • Electrical outlets

All electrical outlets at Norton Children’s Hospital are hospital-grade and childproof, and do not require outlet covers.

  • Name tags and health screenings

Name tags must be worn by all family members and visitors. All guests will be required to obtain a wristband (parents/guardians) or a badge (other guests) before entering an inpatient unit. Daily health screenings will be required for guests.

Learn more about how to prepare yourself and your family for a visit:

Plan Your Visit -5437

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