Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

Norton Children’s Hospital is committed to provide the highest quality medical care for critically ill and seriously injured infants and children. Our healthcare providers have the knowledge and expertise to care for children with complex medical, surgical and traumatic conditions.

The “Just for Kids” Critical Care Center is a multidisciplinary unit where pediatric intensivists and pediatric subspecialists work together to provide the best care possible. The PICU team includes specially trained pediatric critical care nurse practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists and dieticians.

The PICU staff focuses its expertise and resources on the specialized needs of critically ill or injured infants, children and adolescents, as well as those recovering from high-risk surgery.

Critical PICU care for your child

The PICU provides care for children with a wide variety of medical and surgical conditions, including:

  • Congenital heart disease
  • Post-operative recovery from a variety of surgical procedures, including those performed by pediatric general surgeons; neurosurgeons; ear, nose and throat surgeons; plastic surgeons and orthopedic surgeons
  • Kidney and cardiac transplants
  • Traumatic injuries
  • Burn injuries and smoke inhalation
  • Sepsis
  • Respiratory failure
  • Pediatric cancer, including children receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants

The Norton Children’s difference

Here you will find some of the best and brightest minds in pediatric medicine. Our outstanding team includes University of Louisville physicians, pediatric critical care providers, pediatric subspecialists and certified critical care nurses. We provide around-the-clock care from doctors, nurses and therapists who specialize in helping critically ill or injured children.

You are not just a visitor — you’re part of the team. Our family-centered care philosophy recognizes that each family is unique and crucial in providing the support needed to get better. We encourage you to be as involved as possible in your child’s care. You know your child best.

Collaborating with University of Louisville Physicians for your care

Norton Children’s Hospital works with faculty from the University of Louisville to provide the best possible care for you and your child. These doctors are professors and active researchers helping to advance medical care in the 21st century with clinical research and education. Norton Children’s Hospital serves as the primary pediatric teaching facility for the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

Aidan O’Rourke Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Family Room

Located just outside the critical care center, the O’Rourke PICU Family Room allows parents and other family members to stay close to their child. The room has many of the conveniences of home. When a parent or other family member can’t be present, you can rest assured that your child will continue to receive the best possible care. All children in the critical care center are monitored 24/7 by a designated staff member.

PICU – 6000

Contact Us

(502) 629-6000

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