Norton Children’s Endowed Chairs

Endowed chairs at Norton Children’s Hospital are recognized for having made significant accomplishments in their field of study, and they continue to bring forth advancements to ensure a high level of care for our patients.

Kimberly A. Boland, M.D., FAAP

 Billy F. Andrews, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pediatrics

Dr. Boland is a pediatric hospital medicine specialist with Norton Children’s Inpatient Care, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and practices at Norton Children’s Hospital. Dr. Boland currently serves as professor and chair for the Department of Pediatrics for the University of Louisville School of Medicine. She is also assistant dean of resident education and work environment in graduate medical education. She has served on numerous boards locally and nationally, focused on the improvement of medical education. She is a past president of the Kentucky Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics and current District IV representative to the National Nominating Committee, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Dr. Boland is involved in resident and student medical education and advocacy, with her most recent focus on development and evaluation of innovative curricula in areas such as advocacy, social justice, communication, procedural medicine, evidence-based medicine, crisis management and global health initiatives, as well as faculty development. Dr. Boland’s research includes medical education and advocacy, and her work has been featured in numerous publications.

The Billy F. Andrews, M.D. endowed chair in pediatrics was established by the University of Louisville in 1993 in honor of Dr. Andrews, who was a pioneer in clinical neonatology and served at the chairman of the Department of Pediatrics and then as a professor and chairman emeritus.

Kyle B. Brothers, M.D., Ph.D.

Endowed Chair in Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research

Dr. Brothers is a board-certified pediatrician who practices with Norton Children’s Medical Group, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, at Norton Children’s Hospital, and with Norton Children’s Medical Group – Novak Center. Dr. Brothers is an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the UofL School of Medicine, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law. He was previously at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee.

Dr. Brothers serves with several national groups involved in research, most notably the Clinical Sequencing Evidence-Generating Research Consortium, a multisite research program funded jointly by the National Human Genome Research Institute and National Cancer Institute that conducts translational research to evaluate the integration of genome and exome sequencing into clinical care.

He also serves as a member of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This committee advises the secretary of health and human services on federal newborn screening policy.

His research focuses on the translation of genomic technologies into pediatric clinical care. His research efforts have been funded virtually continuously since 2007, and he currently is involved in National Institutes of Health-sponsored research projects that are funded at a total of approximately $7 million.

In addition, he is an associate editor for the journal Genetics in Medicine, the official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, and has served as a reviewer for over 25 professional journals, including Science, PLOS One, Pediatrics, American Journal of Medical Genetics and others. He has authored over 60 peer-reviewed articles, and has been invited to lecture on ethical issues in genetics across the country and internationally.

Lu Cai, M.D., Ph.D.

Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair for Pediatric Research

Dr. Cai serves a professor of pediatrics; radiation oncology; and pharmacology and toxicology for the UofL School of Medicine. He is also the director of the Pediatric Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, for the university. The Pediatric Research Institute’s mission is to improve children’s health, development and well-being through high-quality research. The institute currently houses research programs in sleep neurobiology and Type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Cai’s research interests include cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity; antioxidant metallothionein and its preventive effect on oxidative damage; trace element (zinc, copper, iron) homeostasis; and the biological effects of low-dose radiation. Learn more about Dr. Cai’s work and publications through his research biography.

The Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation chair for pediatric research has been made possible by the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation.

Cynthia D. Downard, M.D.

Hirikati S. Nagaraj, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pediatric Surgery

Dr. Downard is the surgeon-in-chief of Norton Children’s Hospital and division chief of pediatric surgery at the UofL School of Medicine. She is a pediatric surgeon with Norton Children’s Surgery, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. She is a tenured professor of pediatric surgery and the program director of the Pediatric Surgery Fellowship Training Program. Dr. Downard joined UofL in 2007. She was previously the director of surgical critical care at Norton Children’s Hospital. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the American Pediatric Surgical Association. Her clinical expertise includes laparoscopy and thoracoscopy as well as neonates with congenital anomalies.

Dr. Downard has previously pursued research with the UofL Microvascular Control Research Laboratory, aimed at finding new solutions to difficult clinical situations with specific focus on necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

At Norton Children’s Surgery, our fellowship-trained and board-certified pediatric surgeons are available around the clock to help kids from Louisville, Southern Indiana and beyond. They have the experience and skills to conduct a wide variety of operations.

From the most straightforward to the most complex surgeries, you can be confident that your child will receive the highest quality treatment. In addition, every child who has surgery at our hospital is cared for by a fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist. These specialists help provide the safest care for your child.

The Hirikati S. Nagaraj, M.D. endowed chair in pediatric surgery was established in 2009 and pays tribute to Dr. Nagaraj and his more than 30 years of service as a pioneering pediatric surgeon caring for children throughout the region. This endowed chair has been made possible by generous philanthropic support from The Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. Family Foundation as well as several local businesses, individuals and families.

Mary E. Fallat, M.D., pediatric surgeon with Norton Children’s Surgery, who was the previous division chief of pediatric surgery and a colleague of Dr. Nagaraj’s for many years, was selected as the inaugural chair upon Dr. Nagaraj’s retirement in 2009 and held the position until 2020.

Scott D. Duncan, M.D., MHA

Rounsavall Professorship of Neonatology

Dr. Duncan is a neonatologist with Norton Children’s Neonatology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and a Kentucky native whose career has exemplified medical excellence and compassionate care through his teaching and research. He currently serves as the division chief of neonatal medicine for the UofL School of Medicine. He is  board certified in pediatrics and neonatal-perinatal medicine by the American Board of Pediatrics.

His areas of clinical interest include the use of near-infrared spectroscopy and pulmonary hypertension.  His research includes health care finance and economic evaluations. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a member of the Section on Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, where he serves as a coding trainer.

Norton Children’s provides the comprehensive, highly skilled care that newborns may need. With a proven team of accomplished neonatal specialists, our two Norton Children’s neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are dedicated to caring for babies born prematurely or in need of advanced care or surgery.

Our providers, like Dr. Duncan, offer highly skilled care for your child. These doctors are professors and active researchers helping to advance medical care in the 21st century with clinical research and education.

The Rounsavall neonatology professorship was established in 2005 by a gift from the Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. Family Foundation as part of the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation comprehensive campaign and the hospital’s growth plan. The Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. Family Foundation has been a loyal supporter of specialized pediatric health care since 2005. Other areas of the foundation’s philanthropic focus have included endowed positions in pediatric neuroscience/neurosurgery, neurology and general surgery, as well as an endowed chair in adult heart and vascular care.

Ryan J. Dyess, M.D.

Norah Price Fellow in Pediatric Endocrinology

Dr. Dyess is a pediatric endocrinologist with Norton Children’s Endocrinology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. Dr. Dyess attended Ross University School of Medicin in Barbados and completed his residency at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga.

Dr. Dyess has strong personal and professional interests in Type 1 diabetes (T1D), fitness and nutrition research. He was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 9. His undergraduate degree was in computer science, which lends itself well to the integration between technology and medicine and technological innovations.

Combining specialists from Norton Children’s and the UofL School of Medicine, the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center works to provide the best possible care for your child. Our diabetes research team develops medical and technological innovations for a better future living with diabetes.

Norton Children’s Hospital is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UofL School of Medicine and the home of inpatient services for the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center.

The Norah Price fellow in pediatric endocrinology is made possible by the Price Foundation. The Price family was inspired to make a gift to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation after their daughter, Norah, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 4. The family’s generosity supports the work of the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center and initiatives that will help other families like theirs. In addition to the Norah Price fellow in pediatric endocrinology through Norton Children’s Hospital and the UofL School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, they have also established the Norah Price diabetes educator to help patients and families navigate living with Type 1 diabetes.

Michael B. Foster, M.D.

Jack Henderson Chair of Pediatric Endocrinology

Dr. Foster has been a cornerstone for pediatric endocrine care in Louisville for more than 30 years. He is a pediatric endocrinologist with Norton Children’s Endocrinology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and holds a significant and influential leadership role as director of diabetes camps for the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center. In addition to the center’s highest profile community leadership role, Dr. Foster also serves as medical director for Camp Hendon, the largest and longest-running camp for children with Type 1 diabetes in Kentucky. With Dr. Foster’s influence and leadership, Camp Hendon has grown annually, including a recent expansion to a second camp site near Ravenna, Kentucky to serve children with diabetes in Eastern Kentucky. In recognition for his service efforts, he has been named a “Top Doc” in pediatric endocrinology by Louisville Magazine over the past several years.

Dr. Foster is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric endocrinology by the American Board of Pediatrics. His clinical interests include growth disorders and diabetes. His research focuses on growth disorders. Dr. Foster’s work has been featured in numerous publications on topics including the impact of insurance coverage and the family on pediatric diabetes management, generalized anasarca, the rare pediatric brain disease Hashimoto’s encephalopathy and behavioral disorders associated with growth hormones.

Norton Children’s Hospital is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UofL School of Medicine, and the home of inpatient services for the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center.

The Jack Henderson chair of pediatric endocrinology is made possible thanks the generosity of the Novak Family Foundation. In 2013, the foundation made a $5 million commitment to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation that funded the creation of a state-of-the-art comprehensive diabetes care center to offer education and treatment of Type 1 diabetes. The gift also provided support to endow and hire additional specialists and to enhance medical, technological and educational resources and programs available to families and improve inpatient and outpatient care facilities.

Thomas M. Moriarty, M.D., Ph.D.

Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair of Pediatric Neurosurgery

Dr. Moriarty is chief of pediatric neurosurgery at Norton Children’s Hospital and is a pediatric neurosurgeon with Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. He is a gratis clinical professor of neurological surgery for the UofL School Of Medicine. Dr. Moriarty has practiced for more than 25 years and is certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery and the American Board of Pediatric Neurosurgery. He is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Section on Pediatrics, the American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery and the International Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery. Dr. Moriarty was voted by his peers as one of Louisville Magazine’s Top Docs for 2019. He is also a Castle Connelly Top Doctor for many years.

Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute is the current pediatric evolution of the neurosurgical program started in Louisville in 1927 by the neurosurgical pioneer Glen Spurling, M.D. Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute now treats the entire range of pediatric neurosurgical conditions: trauma; brain and spine tumors; congenital brain and spine conditions; craniofacial disorders; hydrocephalus; vascular conditions; and functional neurosurgery.

Dr. Moriarty’s research efforts in Louisville have been focused on clinical effectiveness and innovation.  Norton Healthcare was an early adopter of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and was among the first centers in the world focused on iMRI for pediatric neurosurgery. Current research efforts are on best practices for surgical treatments for congenital brain and spine conditions.

The Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation chair of pediatric neurosurgery has been made possible by The Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. Family Foundation, which has been a loyal supporter of specialized pediatric health care since 2005. Other areas of its philanthropic focus have included endowed positions in neonatology, neurology and general surgery, as well as an endowed chair in adult heart and vascular care.

Michael S. Orangias, M.D.

Cure CF Fellow in Pediatric Pulmonology

Dr. Orangias is a pediatric pulmonologist with Norton Children’s Pulmonology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and is the current Cure CF fellow in pediatric pulmonology through Norton Children’s Hospital and the UofL School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Orangias attended the UofL School of Medicine and completed his residency there.

The Norton Children’s Hospital Cystic Fibrosis Program is accredited by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

The CF program offers an interdisciplinary team approach to managing this complex disease and provides care for children and teens as they transition into adulthood. Each child’s care team includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, nutritionists, social workers and child life specialists. This team works together to provide a customized, family-centered care plan. Because CF affects the whole family, we also help coordinate home health services and other community resources.

The Cure CF fellow in pediatric pulmonology has been made possible by Cure CF Inc., a dedicated group of volunteers who work tirelessly to help cure cystic fibrosis in honor of those they love — children, family members and friends. Their mission is to fund research nationally and locally as well as create a center of excellence in our community, both of which will increase the quality of life for people with CF.

Vinay Puri, M.D.

Gretchen C. Rounsavall Medical Director in Child Neurology

Dr. Puri is a child neurologist with Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and a professor of neurology and pediatrics at the UofL School of Medicine. He has been on the faculty at the medical school since 1995 and is division chief for child neurology and the neurologist-in-chief at Norton Children’s Hospital. He is the founder of the division of child neurology, and under his direction the division has grown to 30 providers. The division also recruits and trains three child neurology residents a year. The division has multiple areas of subspecialization within child neurology and multidisciplinary clinics that include epilepsy, neuro-immunology, neuromuscular disorders, autism, cerebral palsy, stroke, movement disorders, neuro-oncology, tuberous sclerosis and neurofibromatosis.

Dr. Puri is a funded researcher and is the principal investigator for multiple clinical trials. He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, Child Neurology Society, Professors of Child Neurology, Kentucky Medical Society and Commonwealth Neurological Society. He is well recognized for his commitment to education and to the community. He has served in multiple committees in the child neurology society, the University of Louisville and Norton Children’s Hospital. He serves on the board of directors for the Epilepsy Foundation of Kentuckiana.

Dr. Puri has received the Dean’s Lifetime Achievement Award at the UofL School of Medicine as well as other school and community awards. He has been voted as a Louisville “Top Doc” on multiple occasions by his peers as listed in Louisville Magazine.

He is most proud of mentoring multiple medical students who have pursued child neurology training at the most coveted programs in the country, many of who have come back and joined the division as faculty.

Dr. Puri has a special interest in inpatient and critical care neurology and in outpatient complex cases in child neurology. He is board certified in neurology with specialization in pediatric neurology as well as in neurodevelopmental disabilities by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. His work has been published in numerous journals. Select areas of study include juvenile myasthenia gravis, West Nile encephalitis, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and pediatric migraines, among many others.

Norton Children’s Hospital offers outstanding neurological condition diagnosis, treatment and care through child neurology services provided by Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute.

Our child neurologists treat conditions of the brain, spinal cord and all muscles, nerves and blood vessels in these two systems. Our team is dedicated to caring for children with some of the most complex neurological system and nervous system development disorders. We ensure that your family is part of the process and has answers and support along the way.

The Gretchen C. Rounsavall medical director in child neurology has been made possible by the generosity of the Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. Family Foundation, which has been a loyal supporter of specialized pediatric health care since 2005. Other areas of its philanthropic focus have included endowed positions in pediatric neuroscience/neurosurgery, neonatology and general surgery, as well as an endowed chair in adult heart and vascular care.

Ashok B. Raj, M.D.

Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Dr. Raj is a hematologist/oncologist with Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and is the division chief of pediatric hematology/oncology for the medical school’s  Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Raj’s clinical care responsibilities include director of the sickle cell disease and hemoglobinopathies program, director of the hemostasis and thrombosis program, director of the leukemia and lymphoma program, and director of the pediatric erythrocytapheresis program.

His research interests center around Children’s Oncology Group, Beat Childhood Cancer and other investigator-initiated, National Institutes of Health (NIH) and phase 1 to 4 industry-sponsored clinical trials. He is the institutional principal investigator for Children’s Oncology Group and Beat Childhood Cancer and has been the principal investigator or sub-investigator on over 200 clinical trials.

Currently he is the institutional principal investigator on a Health Resources and Services Administration grant related to sickle cell disease, which is part of the NIH Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program and a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute grant related to transition of patients with sickle cell disease from pediatric to adult care. Dr. Raj also serves on the board of the Kentucky Pediatric Cancer Research Trust Fund. His clinical interests include acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemia; Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; sickle cell disease; hemophilia; and disorders of hemostasis and thrombosis. Dr. Raj’s research has been in hemoglobinopathies, quantitative and qualitative disorders of platelets, hemophilia, molecular aspects of pediatric cancer, investigator-initiated trials, device studies and quality improvement initiatives.

The Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation chair of pediatric hematology/oncology has been made possibly by the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation with support from the state of Kentucky.

George C. Rodgers, M.D., Ph.D., FACMT, FAAP, FAACT

Humana Chair in International Pediatrics

Dr. Rodgers is a pediatric hospitalist with Norton Children’s Inpatient Care, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and a professor of pediatrics at the UofL School of Medicine, with a joint appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. He is also chief of the Division of International Pediatrics and associate medical director of the Kentucky Poison Control Center of Norton Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Rodgers has been medical director of the Division of International Pediatrics since its founding in 1990. The program, originally conceived by Humana chairman emeritus David A. Jones, brings more than 200 foreign doctors and nurses to Louisville to train and sends Louisville medical professionals abroad. Once there, they help medical professionals in countries like Romania and Moldova improve their practice and rebuild their health care systems. The program has been funded by the Humana Foundation and David and Betty Jones. Each committed a $1 million endowment, matched by Kentucky’s Bucks for Brains program, to support the chair and provide some operational funding. All of the medical professionals who travel abroad and work with visiting doctors and nurses in Louisville donate their time to the program.

David Jones, the Humana founder, has called Dr. Rodgers “a healer and the dearly beloved medical leader whose effective contributions are without number!”

Dr. Rodgers has published 15 books and book chapters and more than 55 peer-reviewed articles, and has made more than 117 national and international presentations. He is on the editorial board of the journal Clinical Toxicology and is a reviewer for the Journal of Pediatrics, Pediatrics, JAMA and the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

He was named Louisville Doctor of the Year-International in 2004 and was awarded honorary doctor of medicine degrees from the University of Sibiu and University of Bucharest in Romania in appreciation of his contributions to the medical field in that country.

Dr. Rodgers is a member of the Louisville Emergency Planning Committee, the National Research Council (National Academy of Sciences) Committee on Combined Exposures to Hydrogen Cyanide and Carbon Monoxide, the American Association of Poison Control Centers, the Committee on Pediatric Poisoning, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning and the CDC Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Editorial Consultancy Committee.

He earned his doctorate in organic chemistry at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, and completed a NATO postdoctoral fellowship. He earned his medical degree at the State University of New York and completed his residency in pediatrics at the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center, both in Syracuse.

Kupper A. Wintergerst, M.D.

Wendy L. Novak Chair of Pediatric Diabetes Care and Clinical Research

Dr. Wintergerst is a pediatric endocrinologist with Norton Children’s Endocrinology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and serves as the division chief of pediatric endocrinology for the UofL School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, where he is professor of pediatrics. He also has served as director of the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center since 2013. Dr. Wintergerst leads the center’s use of advanced technologies and therapeutics for advanced diabetes care, community and medical education, and innovative clinical research.

While continuing to care for patients in the clinical setting, he maintains a strong interest in teaching, community service, public health and clinical research and holds several local, regional and national leadership positions. His primary clinical and research focus is in the realm of diabetes mellitus; improving life, preventing, and, ultimately curing Type 1 diabetes. He became director of TrialNet Diabetes Studies, an international research consortium for the prevention of Type 1 diabetes mellitus, in 2011, and director of the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange and Pediatric Diabetes Consortium in 2015 and 2017.

Combining specialists from Norton Children’s and the UofL School of Medicine, the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center works to provide the best possible care for children with diabetes. Our diabetes research team develops medical and technological innovations for a better future living with diabetes.

Norton Children’s Hospital is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UofL School of Medicine, and the home of inpatient services for the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center.

The Wendy L. Novak chair of pediatric diabetes care and clinical research is made possible thanks to the generosity of the Novak Family Foundation. In 2013, the foundation made a $5 million commitment to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation that funded the creation of a state-of-the-art comprehensive diabetes care center to offer education and treatment of Type 1 diabetes. The gift also provided support to endow and hire additional specialists; enhance medical, technological and educational resources and programs available to families; and improve inpatient and outpatient care facilities.

Yi Tan, Ph.D.

Carol B. McFerran Chair of Pediatric Diabetes Research

Yi Tan, Ph.D., serves as an associate professor of pediatrics for the UofL School of Medicine. His lab is focusing on studies related to signaling pathways and therapeutic strategies in diabetic complications including cardiomyopathy, vasculopathy, endothelial progenitor cell and ischemic angiogenesis, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. By using animal models with genetic manipulations and cutting-edge techniques in molecular and cell biology, his research seeks to develop effective strategies for preventing diabetic complications. One of the current research projects is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). To see a research biography, click here.

The Carol B. McFerran chair of pediatric diabetes research has been made possibly by the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation with support from the commonwealth of Kentucky.

Jaime Walker, MSN, RN, MLDE, CDE, CPN

Norah Price Educator in Pediatric Endocrinology

In her role as the Norah Price educator in pediatric oncology, Jaime educates families with a child newly diagnosed with diabetes. She teaches a variety of topics including how to measure blood sugar to determine how much insulin a child needs.

Caring for children with diabetes, especially those who are newly diagnosed, requires a coordinated approach both in and out of the hospital. This starts with physicians, diabetes educators and caregivers in the hospital and continues with ongoing outpatient care by physicians, nurse practitioners, educators, nurses and care coordinators.

Jaime is a clinical supervisor, diabetes nurse clinician and certified diabetes educator registered nurse at the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center. She obtained a master’s degree in nursing education at Indiana Wesleyan University received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Louisville,. She is a certified pediatric nurse and was named Norton Children’s Hospital Nurse of the Year in 2016. She also received honorable mention in the UofL School of Nursing Florence Nightingale Awards in 2016.

The Norah Price educator in pediatric endocrinology position is made possible by the Price Foundation. The Price family was inspired to make a gift to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation after their daughter, Norah, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 4. Their generosity supports the work of the Wendy Novak Diabetes Center and initiatives that will help other families like theirs. In addition to the Norah Price educator in pediatric endocrinology through Norton Children’s Hospital and the UofL School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, the family also established the Norah Price fellow in pediatric endocrinology to care for patients and families living with Type 1 diabetes.

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