Blood and Marrow Transplant

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, has been home to the Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Program since 1993. It is the region’s only blood and marrow transplant program dedicated to helping kids. The program is made up of a dedicated team of clinicians and supporting staff specially trained to provide comprehensive care to pediatric patients who need blood and bone marrow transplants.

Norton Children’s Hospital is a member of the Pediatric Blood & Marrow Transplant Consortium and the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy for high-quality care of transplant patients.

What Is a Blood and Marrow Transplant?

The purpose of a blood and marrow transplant, or blood stem cell transplant, is to replace diseased bone marrow with healthy marrow. Marrow is the spongy material in the center of bones that contains blood stem cells, immature but versatile mother cells from which red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets develop.

Bone marrow makes three types of blood cells:

  • Red blood cells, which are the oxygen carriers in the body
  • White blood cells, which are infection-fighting cells
  • Platelets, which help form clots to stop bleeding

Blood and marrow transplantation uses stem cells obtained from:

  • Bone marrow
  • Blood stem cells collected from peripheral blood
  • Blood stem cells obtained from the umbilical cord

There are two types of stem cell transplants:

  • Autologous – Using the child’s own stem cells
  • Allogeneic – Using stem cells from either a family member or an unrelated donor

The type of transplant needed depends on a child’s particular disease. Diseases treated by transplant include, but are not limited to:

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)
  • Aplastic anemia
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis
  • Neuroblastoma
  • Lymphomas
  • Brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma
  • Relapsed or refractory solid tumors, such as Ewing sarcoma
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Primary immunodeficiency diseases

A patient who needs a blood or marrow transplant will usually first receive several days of chemotherapy to prepare the body to accept the donor stem cells. The donor cells then will be transplanted into the patient through a simple infusion into a vein. Repopulation of the patient’s blood system with heathy donor blood cells will usually happen about three to four weeks afterward. During this time, close monitoring of the patient will be required to detect the occurrence of transplant-associated side effects.

Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

Our blood and marrow transplant team uses a holistic approach to providing transplant care to our patients, paying attention to both the physical and psychosocial aspects of care. The transplant team works closely with the patient’s own primary oncology team to select the best transplant regimen, performs meticulous donor searches to identify the most suitable donor and conducts extensive educational activities with the family to familiarize them with the transplant process.

An integrated team of clinicians, nurses, child life specialists, physical therapists, social workers and psychologists work intimately with each patient and family to manage acute medical issues and alleviate anxiety and discomfort. Usually, by the end of the transplant process, the team and the patient’s family will have become close partners working together to provide seamless care.

Even though blood and marrow transplantation is a complex procedure that could carry serious side effects, enhancements in quality assurance and supportive care have improved the overall clinical outcome.

The Norton Children’s Cancer Institute Blood and Marrow Transplant Program is led by William T. Tse, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Tse trained at Yale, Stanford and Harvard universities, and brings outstanding new visions and abundant experience in blood and marrow transplant and cellular therapy. Our team is proud to be committed to providing this type of specialized care.

Meet Our Team

Leadership

William T. Tse, M.D., Ph.D.

Medical Director, Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

Providers

Alexandra C. Cheerva, M.D.
Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

Michael Huang, M.D.
Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist, Blood and Marrow Transplant

Esther E. Knapp, M.D.
Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist, Blood and Marrow Transplant

Jun Zhao, D.O.
Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist, Blood and Marrow Transplant

Nicola Jones, APRN
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurse Practitioner

Victoria S.  Zelko, APRN
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurse Practitioner

Nursing and Support Staff

Shana Bowling, R.N.
Blood & Marrow Transplant Nurse Clinician

Susan M. Craycroft, R.N.
Blood & Marrow Transplant Nurse Clinician

Tracy Jennings, R.N.
Blood & Marrow Transplant Nurse Clinician

Rachel Andrews
Medical Laboratory Scientist

Beth Hubbard
Medical Laboratory Scientist

Emily D. McCown
Medical Laboratory Scientist

Spencer Moorman, MSW, CSW
Social Worker

Jennifer D. Thomas, DNP, R.N.
Director, Patient Care Services, Organ Transplant Services

Cancer – 7725

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

Talk to a member of our care team about advanced pediatric cancer care.

Call (502) 629-7725


Request an Appointment Online

Haploidentical blood marrow transplant patient reaches milestones, celebrates turning 18

On Valentine’s Day, 2020, Angel Florian received a 6-foot-tall plush rose from her boyfriend. It was a substitute for the real flowers he wanted to give her but couldn’t because her weakened immune system made […]

Read Full Story

Teen’s ‘got this’ after bone cancer surgery

Jennifer Paschal, like most teens, has many interests. The 13-year-old, who lives in Southern Indiana, enjoys spending time with her large family. She loves animals and has many pets. She likes to draw and paint, […]

Read Full Story

What to expect after a childhood cancer diagnosis

The mixture of emotions that emerges with a new childhood cancer diagnosis can cause overwhelming feelings in both the child and the family. Childhood cancer treatment has evolved from a sole focus on medical treatment […]

Read Full Story

‘Go Gold’ to support kids with cancer

Kids’ cancer diagnoses haven’t stopped during the COVID-19 pandemic and neither has their fight. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and the time of the year when Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with UofL School […]

Read Full Story

$1.5 million in support to fund innovative pediatric cancer research

Louisville philanthropist Tom Dunbar will provide support up to $1.5 million to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation for pediatric cancer research at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. This gift […]

Read Full Story
Related Stories

Haploidentical blood marrow transplant patient reaches milestones, celebrates turning 18

On Valentine’s Day, 2020, Angel Florian received a 6-foot-tall plush rose from her boyfriend. It was a substitute for the real flowers he wanted to give her but couldn’t because her weakened immune system made […]

Read Full Story

Teen’s ‘got this’ after bone cancer surgery

Jennifer Paschal, like most teens, has many interests. The 13-year-old, who lives in Southern Indiana, enjoys spending time with her large family. She loves animals and has many pets. She likes to draw and paint, […]

Read Full Story

What to expect after a childhood cancer diagnosis

The mixture of emotions that emerges with a new childhood cancer diagnosis can cause overwhelming feelings in both the child and the family. Childhood cancer treatment has evolved from a sole focus on medical treatment […]

Read Full Story

‘Go Gold’ to support kids with cancer

Kids’ cancer diagnoses haven’t stopped during the COVID-19 pandemic and neither has their fight. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and the time of the year when Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with UofL School […]

Read Full Story

$1.5 million in support to fund innovative pediatric cancer research

Louisville philanthropist Tom Dunbar will provide support up to $1.5 million to the Norton Children’s Hospital Foundation for pediatric cancer research at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. This gift […]

Read Full Story

Search our entire site.