Blood and marrow transplant

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the University of Louisville, has been home to the Hannah Evans Bone Marrow Transplant Program, the region’s only blood and marrow transplant program dedicated to helping kids, since 1993. Norton Children’s Hospital is a member of the Pediatric Blood & Marrow Transplant Consortium and the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network and is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy for high-quality care provided to transplant patients.

What is a blood and marrow transplant?

The purpose of a bone marrow transplant is to replace a patient’s diseased bone marrow with healthy marrow. Bone marrow is the spongy material in the center of bones. The bone marrow makes three types of blood cells:

  • Red blood cells (RBCs), which are the oxygen carriers in the body
  • White blood cells (WBCs) which are infection-fighting cells
  • Platelets, which help form clots which stop bleeding

Stem cells are immature cells from which red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets all develop.

Blood and marrow transplantation uses stem cells obtained from:

  • Bone marrow
  • Peripheral blood (white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets)
  • Cells from the umbilical cord

There are two types of stem cell transplants:

  • Autologous – using the child’s own stem cells
  • Allogeneic – using stem cells from either a family member or an unrelated donor

The type of transplant depends on a child’s particular disease.

Diseases treated by transplant include, but are not limited to:

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)
  • Aplastic anemia
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis
  • Neuroblastoma
  • Lymphomas
  • Brain tumors such as medulloblastoma
  • Relapsed or refractory solid tumors such as Ewing’s sarcoma
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Primary immunodeficiency diseases

Meet our team

Michael Huang, M.D.

Pediatric Hematology

Alexandra C. Cheerva, M.D.

Pediatric Medical Oncology

Esther Knapp, M.D.

Pediatric Hematology

William T. Tse, M.D.

Pediatric Medical Oncology

Nicola Jones, APRN

Oncology Nurse Practioner

Vicki Zelko, APRN

Pediatric Medical Oncology Nurse Practioner

Susan Craycroft, R.N.

Spencer Moorman – Social Worker

Cynthia Hewitt – Lab Technician

Cancer – 7725

Contact Us

Advanced pediatric cancer care that isn’t too far from home.

(502) 629-7725

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