Services and Condition Specialties at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

At Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, we provide evaluation and treatment for a wide range of oncology and hematology conditions. While following the guidelines of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), each plan of cancer care is customized to meet the individual needs of the child or teen. We work closely with families to find the right treatment for each child and include families in every step of the process. We understand that childhood and adolescent cancer affects everyone in the family, and our goal is to help preserve quality of life during and after therapy.

Clinical Trials

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group, which provides families in the region access to all national clinical trials. With nearly 100 active trials at any given time for pediatric and adolescent cancers, many of our treatment plans include participation in trials that give families access to the latest in cancer research and treatment options.

Leukemia and Lymphoma

Leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow and is the most common type of cancer in children. The most common types of leukemia include:

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)
  • Acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
  • Chronic myeloblastic leukemia (CML)

Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, a part of the body’s immune system. Lymphoma can start in almost any part of the body and spread to other tissues or organs and is the third most common childhood cancer. Types of lymphoma found in children often include:

  • Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, T-cell and B-cell subtypes

We offer innovative clinical trials and a wide range of treatments, including secondary treatment options such as stem cell transplantation for children of all ages and with all forms of pediatric leukemia and lymphoma.

Brain and Spine Tumors

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute has Kentucky’s only multidisciplinary pediatric brain and spinal cord tumor treatment program. The program provides specialized care for children and teens with brain and spinal cord tumors through a team approach that includes a neuroradiologist, neuro-oncologist, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neurologist, pathologists, physical and occupational therapists and a psychologist. Brain tumors in children and teens are different from those in adults, and our team of pediatric specialists works to offer the best outcomes for these children and the highest possible quality of life after treatment.

Cancer – 7725

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

Talk to a member of our care team about advanced pediatric cancer care.

Call (502) 629-7725


Request an Appointment Online

Early symptoms of neuroblastoma can mimic other common childhood illnesses

Neuroblastoma is a rare type of childhood cancer that starts in the nerve cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and usually affects infants and children under age 5. The average age of diagnosis is 18 [...]

Read Full Story

Children with cyclic neutropenia are at higher risk of developing severe bacterial infections

Cyclic neutropenia is a rare disorder that happens when the blood doesn’t have enough neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that aids in fighting bacteria. “In cyclic neutropenia, a child experiences regular episodes of […]

Read Full Story

Boy fighting cancer has passion for giving back

Methotrexate and vincristine are complex words for most, but 7-year-old Beckham Goodale knows them and can pronounce them just as well as any doctor. They’re words no child should know, but this is the reality [...]

Read Full Story

A 39-year career of discovery as kids with cancer and blood disorders were able to thrive

Thirty-nine years ago, Diane Burnett, APRN, wasn’t sure she was cut out to care for kids with cancer and blood disorders. Give it a year, she figured. “I didn’t know if I would be a […]

Read Full Story

Questions to ask about a child’s cancer diagnosis

When a child is diagnosed with cancer, it can be overwhelming for the patient and their entire family. Parents likely will have many questions, especially in the beginning, and providers encourage them to be inquisitive […]

Read Full Story
Related Stories

Early symptoms of neuroblastoma can mimic other common childhood illnesses

Neuroblastoma is a rare type of childhood cancer that starts in the nerve cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and usually affects infants and children under age 5. The average age of diagnosis is 18 [...]

Read Full Story

Children with cyclic neutropenia are at higher risk of developing severe bacterial infections

Cyclic neutropenia is a rare disorder that happens when the blood doesn’t have enough neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that aids in fighting bacteria. “In cyclic neutropenia, a child experiences regular episodes of […]

Read Full Story

Boy fighting cancer has passion for giving back

Methotrexate and vincristine are complex words for most, but 7-year-old Beckham Goodale knows them and can pronounce them just as well as any doctor. They’re words no child should know, but this is the reality [...]

Read Full Story

A 39-year career of discovery as kids with cancer and blood disorders were able to thrive

Thirty-nine years ago, Diane Burnett, APRN, wasn’t sure she was cut out to care for kids with cancer and blood disorders. Give it a year, she figured. “I didn’t know if I would be a […]

Read Full Story

Questions to ask about a child’s cancer diagnosis

When a child is diagnosed with cancer, it can be overwhelming for the patient and their entire family. Parents likely will have many questions, especially in the beginning, and providers encourage them to be inquisitive […]

Read Full Story

Search our entire site.