Hip Adductor Lengthening

What Is Hip Adductor Lengthening?

The groin muscles that pull the legs closer together are called the hip adductors. Sometimes these muscles get too tight and interfere with going to the bathroom and personal hygiene. These muscles also can pull too much when a child is walking, causing the knees to rub.

What Does This Surgery Help With?

If the muscles are allowed to continue to pull, it can cause the slow dislocation of one or both hips. Hip adductor lengthening is performed through a small (less than one inch) incision right over the tight part of the muscle that you can feel. It helps immediately. The incision is closed with stitches under the skin.

Follow-Up

We will give you a special brace or pillow for your child to use between the knees at night to keep the knees from touching. If your child is allowed to sleep with the knees touching after the surgery, the muscles may heal back together just as tight as they started. It should be used initially at least 22 hours a day, even while at school if possible. Your child can walk and go to physical therapy after this surgery.

Related Stories

What to expect during an ACL tear recovery
Norton Children’s opens new Hikes Point campus
7 most common sports overuse injuries in kids
Tethering for scoliosis offers children more benefits, faster recovery