Tuberous Sclerosis (TS)

Norton Children’s board-certified and fellowship-trained neurologists are the leading providers of tuberous sclerosis (TS) care in Louisville, Kentucky and Southern Indiana.

Norton Children’s Hospital is the pediatric teaching hospital for the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Our physicians have expertise in their fields and are training the next generation of pediatric specialists.

We’ll determine the severity of your child’s tuberous sclerosis and create a treatment plan that minimizes risk, so your child can get back to being a kid.

What is tuberous sclerosis?

Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disorder associated with tumors that forms in various parts of the body, including the skin, brain, eyes, heart, kidneys and lungs.

Most of these tumors are considered benign or noncancerous. These may get larger, but they do not tend to spread to other areas of the body. The extent of these tumors and other symptoms associated with TS varies greatly among individuals.

Tumors affecting the brain include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) and tubers.

Symptoms of tuberous sclerosis

Children with TS frequently have seizures with onset during infancy. They are at risk for a severe form of epilepsy in childhood called infantile spasms. Children with TS may have delays in reaching developmental milestones and may have intellectual disability.

A child’s eyes also may be affected, with small tumors developing on the retina. These tumors also may involve the optic nerves, which send signals from the retina to the brain.

Some children have changes on the skin, including patches or spots of decreased pigment; small raised bumps on the face known as angiofibromas; plaques of raised, thickened skin on the forehead, scalp or cheeks; and areas of irregularly shaped, thickened, flesh-colored rash called a shagreen patch.

A child can develop tumors called angiomyolipomas that affect the kidneys. Cysts in the kidneys also are more prevalent in people with TS. Sometimes, a condition, more common in adults, called lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) develops in the lungs and affects breathing. Babies with TS may be born with a tumor in the heart called a rhabdomyoma. These may cause arrhythmias or obstruction of blood flow through the heart. They typically regress with time on their own.

Diagnosis

If our team suspects your child has TS based on skin findings or seizures, members will order additional tests. These tests may include imaging of the brain (MRI of the brain), imaging of the heart (echocardiogram) and imaging of the kidneys (renal ultrasounds). A complete neurologic and ophthalmologic (eye) exam should be performed. If team members suspect seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) will be performed. We also may order blood tests, including genetic testing.

Treatment for TS

Though there is no cure for TS, our multidisciplinary TS team will work together to address active issues and monitor your child for the development of other aspects of the disease as they arise. Many children with TS require antiepileptic medications in order to reduce the risk of seizures. There are medications available to help reduce the size of SEGAs and kidney tumors, should these develop.

Some patients with TS may be candidates for surgery. If your child’s seizures are resistant to medications, your child will be evaluated by our refractory epilepsy team and evaluated for possible epilepsy surgery.

Possible surgical options include removal of small lesions (focal cortical resection), separation of the two hemispheres of the brain (corpus callosotomy) and placement of a vagal nerve stimulator. SEGAs may require surgery if they cause blockage of the spinal fluid flow (hydrocephalus).

Meet our team

University of Louisville Multidisciplinary Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic

Arpita Lakhotia, M.D.

Sushil Gupta, M.D.

Leah Todd, social worker

Additional providers:

Alexander Asamoah, M.D.

Priyanka Bakhtiani, M.D.

William C. Gump, M.D.

Joseph Hersh, M.D.

Nina Kahloon, M.D.

William Lohr, M.D.

Maria Mendoza, M.D.

Ashley Neal, M.D.

Kelly Jackson, genetic counselor

Neuroscience

Contact Us

Connect to the Norton Children’s Hospital Neurology team
(502) 588-3650

Connect with Norton Children’s Neurosurgery team
(502) 583-1697

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