Pulmonary Fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis is scarring in the lungs. Over time, scarring can make it harder for oxygen to get into the blood. The low levels of oxygen, as well as the scarring itself, can cause shortness of breath and other issues. Pulmonary fibrosis is part of a family of conditions called interstitial lung disease. The pediatric pulmonologists with Norton Children’s Pulmonology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, have the training and expertise to treat pulmonary fibrosis.

What Is Pulmonary Fibrosis?

Pulmonary fibrosis is an interstitial lung disease that causes scar tissue to build up in the lungs, making it harder to breathe and for oxygen to get into the blood. Pulmonary fibrosis is a rare disease.

Pulmonary Fibrosis Causes

Some types of pulmonary fibrosis have a clear cause, while others don’t. If no clear cause can be identified, it’s called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Types with an identifiable cause include:

  • Autoimmune (connective tissue disease-related pulmonary fibrosis): This type can be brought on by autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, Sjögren’s syndrome, polymyositis, dermatomyositis and antisynthetase syndrome.
  • Drug-induced: This type can happen as a side effect of medicines such as chemotherapy.
  • Environment-related (hypersensitivity pneumonitis): This type can be caused by exposure to certain triggers, such as mold or animals.
  • Radiation-induced: This can be caused by radiation treatment to the chest.
  • Occupational (pneumoconiosis): This type can be caused by exposure to dusts, fumes, fibers or vapors, such as asbestos, coal, silica, etc.

Pulmonary Fibrosis Treatment

The pediatric pulmonologists with Norton Children’s Pulmonology will create a care plan based on your child’s age, current health and medical history. The goals of pulmonary fibrosis treatment include:

  • Preventing further lung damage
  • Preventing low blood oxygen
  • Reducing extra strain on breathing
  • Promoting growth through nutritional support

Pediatric Pulmonary Center

Our center specializes in caring for children with any type of respiratory disorder. Careful consideration is given to prescribe the best possible method of therapy following nationally accepted guidelines for treating pulmonary fibrosis, where applicable.

Pulmonology – 4940

Norton Children’s Pulmonology

Call for More Information

(502) 588-4940

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