Norton Children’s Neonatal Follow-up Clinic

The Norton Children’s Neonatal Follow-up Clinic is for babies who need continued monitoring after they leave the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The goal is to help your baby develop to their maximum potential and prevent complications through ongoing evaluation and treatment.

The clinic provides specialized medical, nutritional and developmental care for NICU graduates who are medically fragile or at risk for developmental delays. The clinic is staffed by board-certified neonatologists and specialized nurses. Babies also have the opportunity to work with psychologists, social workers and speech, occupational and physical therapists as needed.

The clinic is an evaluation center for First Steps, Kentucky’s system for providing services to children up to age 3 with developmental disabilities and their families.

Why Would My Baby Be Referred to the Neonatal Follow-up Clinic?

  • Prematurity (birth prior to 32 weeks’ gestation)
  • Low birth weight
  • Feeding or growth concerns
  • Brain bleed, seizures or other neurological conditions
  • Congenital heart defect
  • Need for home oxygen, apnea monitor or other assistive breathing devices
  • Drug exposure and/or withdrawal
  • If your baby’s NICU stay required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

Neonatal Follow-up Clinic Care

  • Specialized care from pediatric surgeons, neurologists, cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons, as needed
  • Management of home oxygen and weaning
  • Growth, feeding and nutritional assessments
  • Standardized developmental testing beginning when the baby is 3 months old, including motor, language, vision and cognitive skills
  • Coordination of developmental care near your home

Visiting the Neonatal Follow-up Clinic

Your first visit to the clinic will be two to four weeks after leaving the NICU. Depending on your baby’s health and development, your baby may be seen in the clinic every one to four months.

Your child may need to visit the clinic up to age 3.

For your first visit, plan to be at the clinic for one to two hours depending on the appointment type. Bring formula or breast milk and current bottle you are using. The clinic can teach you how to prepare formula or breast milk. The bottle and its nipple will be checked to ensure it is right for your baby. If your baby uses a home oxygen unit and monitor, bring them to your first appointment.

The Norton Children’s Neonatal Follow-up Clinic core team sees patients at the following locations:

Downtown Louisville

Novak Center for Children’s Health, Level 2
411 E. Chestnut St.
Louisville, KY 40202
Phone: (502) 588-0982, ext. 50148
Fax: (502) 588-0853

St. Matthews

Norton Children’s Perinatal Center
Norton Medical Plaza 3 – St. Matthews, Suite 606
4123 Dutchmans Lane
Louisville, KY 40207
Phone: (502) 896-2500
Fax: (502) 896-2527

Outreach Clinics

Call the Neonatal Follow-Up Clinics in Bowling Green, Owensboro or Paducah, Kentucky, at (502) 588-0982.
Fax: (502) 588-0853

Bowling Green

Norton Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center
Commonwealth Medical Plaza, Suite 102
720 Second Ave.
Bowling Green, KY 42101

Owensboro

Norton Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center
Breckenridge Medical Plaza, Suite 301
1000 Breckenridge St.
Owensboro, KY 42303

Paducah

Norton Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center
2605 Kentucky Ave., Suite 102
Paducah, KY 42001

Neonatologist champions follow-up clinic for NICU graduates

When Hannah R. Fischer, M.D., neonatologist with Norton Children’s Neonatology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, was doing her pediatric residency, it was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where she found her […]

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Even when she’s delivering the most advanced care to the sickest babies, Tamina R.B. Singh, M.D., medical director of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Norton Children’s Hospital, never loses sight of the family. […]

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Neonatologist champions follow-up clinic for NICU graduates

When Hannah R. Fischer, M.D., neonatologist with Norton Children’s Neonatology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, was doing her pediatric residency, it was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where she found her […]

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Strategies for reducing the infant mortality rate

A pregnant patient’s race, social status, access to medical care and living conditions all can affect whether they are more likely to deliver a baby weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (low birth weight), […]

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