Norton Children’s Brain Tumor Program

Children and teenagers need brain tumor care tailored to their unique needs. The specialists at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, and Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine, work together to offer advanced care and the highest possible quality of life after treatment for children with brain tumors.

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

Norton Children’s Neuroscience Institute

 Norton Children’s Neuro-oncology Clinic

Norton Children’s has Kentucky’s only multidisciplinary pediatric spinal cord and brain tumor treatment program. Because children require a different type of care than adults, our specialists have expertise in treating brain tumors in children.

Our team provides specialized care that includes the expertise of a pediatric neuroradiologist, neuro-oncologist, neurosurgeons and neurologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and a psychologist. Our team works to offer top-notch care for your child combined with quality of life after treatment.

Norton Children’s Neuro-oncology Clinic

Cancer – 7725

Norton Children’s Cancer Institute

Talk to a member of our care team about advanced pediatric cancer care.

Call (502) 629-7725


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A 2017 study in the Journal of Neuro-Oncology showed that children in Appalachia, a region that spans 13 states including large parts of Eastern Kentucky, are more at risk for a type of pediatric brain […]

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What is juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA)?

A 2017 study in the Journal of Neuro-Oncology showed that children in Appalachia, a region that spans 13 states including large parts of Eastern Kentucky, are more at risk for a type of pediatric brain […]

Read Full Story

Pediatrician, brain surgeon and oncologist team up to help boy recover

In 2016, not long after his fourth birthday, Jameson Milby started having headaches, nausea and vomiting. “I’m one of those moms who calls the doctor for a scrape on the knee, so I made an […]

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