Biologics for asthma can help limit children’s asthma attacks, other severe symptoms

Children who use biologics for asthma can limit the disruptions in their daily life, including fewer missed days of school, due to their severe asthma.

For children with severe asthma who continue to have symptoms despite using daily controller inhalers, a newer type of therapy called biologics could be able to offer them some much-needed relief.

“Biologics significantly can help our pediatric patients when it comes to managing their severe asthma,” said Scott G. Bickel, M.D., pediatric pulmonologist with Norton Children’s Pulmonology, affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine. “Biologics can target the inflammatory molecules that cause asthma-related allergies and improve kids’ overall quality of life.”

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Why choose biologics for asthma?

Biologics are a type of injectable therapy that target very specific pathways of inflammation. They can reduce asthma symptoms and asthma attacks, including those that require emergency treatment, hospitalization or steroid medications. Children who use biologics for asthma can limit the disruptions in their daily life, including fewer missed days of school, due to their severe asthma.

Children with severe asthma may have had several trips to the emergency department or been admitted to the intensive care unit, even though they are receiving treatment for their asthma. A child may be a good candidate for biologic therapy if their asthma cannot be controlled by the use of inhalers, controller medications and by avoiding triggers.

Biologics are administered in the Norton Children’s Severe Asthma Clinic, a multidisciplinary clinic involving the Norton Children’s Pulmonology and Norton Children’s Allergy & Immunology teams, which specializes in caring for children with the most difficult-to-treat and severe cases of asthma.

“The Norton Children’s Severe Asthma Clinic is a unique offering and gives patients a comprehensive evaluation that isn’t available anywhere else in Louisville or the immediate surrounding area,” said Adrian R. O’Hagan, M.D., pediatric pulmonologist with Norton Children’s Pulmonology and co-leader of the Severe Asthma Clinic.

Examples of biologics

A biologic is taken at regular intervals, either as a shot or through an IV, every two to eight weeks, depending on the type of biologic used.

Xolair (omalizumab), Nucala (mepolizumab) and Dupixent (dupilumab) are Food and Drug Administration-approved for children ages 6 and older. Other biologics, such as Fasenra (benralizumab) and Tezspire (tezepelumab-ekko) are approved for children ages 12 and older. A provider will conduct various screening tests, including bloodwork or allergy tests, to determine which biologic would be best for your child.

Although biologics aim to reduce severe asthma symptoms, children must continue to take their inhalers and controlling medications.

Asthma

IAA - Vitamin D Supplementation in Children with Obesity Related Asthma (VDORA1)
Study Type: Drug Study
Scott Bickel, M.D.
Scott Bickel, M.D.
Principal Investigator
Norton Children's Pulmonology,
affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine
Sponsor: IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network (ISP

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Study Type: Observational
Scott Bickel, M.D.
Scott Bickel, M.D.
Principal Investigator
Norton Children's Pulmonology,
affiliated with the UofL School of Medicine
Sponsor: NIH

Pulmonology

Norton Children's Pulmonology – Novak Center

Location Details

Norton Children's Pulmonology – Brownsboro

Location Details
Pulmonology

Norton Children’s Pulmonology

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