PAGE Services and Treatments

The Pediatric and Adolescent Gender Education (PAGE) program provides care based on the latest research that is consistent with guidelines outlined by the Endocrine Society and the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. Our care also aligns with the Family Acceptance Project.

Care plans are unique to each patient, depending on their needs and goals. Our team works with patients to build a plan based on:

  • Patient’s gender identity
  • Patient’s age and stage of development
  • Patient’s and family’s readiness for pursuing next steps
  • Treatment costs

Children and teens who come to PAGE can expect to receive:

  • A medical interview, physical examination and care plan: The child’s age, stage of physical development and desired treatments are considered when developing a care plan. We also help the whole family understand the risks and benefits of treatment, including costs.
  • Psychosocial assessment, including mental health support and readiness discussion: The child will be assessed by a behavioral health professional with experience in treating transgender and gender-diverse individuals, which can include individual patient and family psychosocial interviews.
  • Patient and family social support services: We offer a transgender support group, which meets on the third Tuesday of every month.
  • Care coordination:
    • Endocrine nurses are available to help teach patients how to administer some treatments.
    • Social workers guide patients with school and legal challenges (name changes for state and legal documents, letters of support for school, etc.).

Depending on a patient’s unique needs, gender-affirming treatment plans may include:

  • Hormone therapy: This treatment is used to help a person’s body become consistent with their gender identity. For example, individuals born female but identifying as male may take testosterone to develop male secondary sex characteristics, such as facial hair, or delay or stop periods.
  • Menstrual health and emotional support: Treatments such as birth control can help manage feelings of gender dysphoria by helping to skip or eliminate menstruation.
  • Puberty blockers: Puberty blockers are a type of treatment that delays the onset of puberty. This can help prevent the development of sex characteristics, including voice changes, facial hair or breast development. This treatment phase can be used to affirm and confirm gender identity.
  • Referrals to other pediatric specialists as needed and/or desired, including a:
    • Gynecologist
    • Psychiatrist
    • Pediatric surgeon
    • Plastic surgeon
    • Speech-language pathologist

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