5 July recalls you need to know about

By now you’ve likely heard Ikea is recalling 29 million dressers and chests because they can fall on young children. Three kids have died as a result.

While these types of massive recalls receive significant media attention, thousands of others fly under the radar. Erika Janes, R.N., child safety advocate for the Children’s Hospital Foundation Office of Child Advocacy of Norton Children’s Hospital, said many products can be just as harmful or deadly if parents aren’t informed.

“We have to stay on top of this as best we can to protect our kids, and it starts with filling out the product registration cards,” Janes said. “Don’t throw away the cards that come with many goods. Fill them out and send them in so manufacturers can contact you in the event of a recall.”

Every month, Safe Kids Worldwide releases a list of major product recalls that parents need to watch for. Here are the top 5 for July:

Hoverboards: The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) decided to recall more than 500,000 of the popular but controversial toy. Hoverboards are powered by lithium-ion batteries, which can overheat, smoke, catch on fire and even explode. Find the specific brand recalls here.

Liquid Plumr clog removers: Clorox recalled three types because the caps fail to meet child-resistant closure requirements. They are Liquid Plumr Pro-Strength Foaming Clog Fighter, Liquid Plumr Industrial Strength Urgent Clear and Liquid Plumr Pro-Strength Urgent Clear clog removers.

Jogging strollers: Pacific Cycle recalled swivel wheel jogging strollers because the front wheel can become loose and detach, causing crash and fall hazards.

Baby swaddles and sleeping bags: Little Lotus recalled baby swaddles and sleeping bags because the shoulder snaps can break or detach, posing a choking hazard to small children.

Floor lamps: Home Source recalled floor lamps because of defective sockets, leading to fire and shock hazards.

If you don’t know the history of a product — for example, if you see something at a yard sale or secondhand store — think twice about buying it, according to Janes. You can look up products at such sites as Recalls.gov and CPSC.gov.

If you don’t know the history of a product — for example, if you see something at a yard sale or secondhand store — think twice about buying it, according to Janes. You can look up products at such sites as Recalls.gov and CPSC.gov.

 


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