My son loves video games. He spends hours every day in his room playing them. Is there any redeeming educational value to video games? Some seem like they could help him learn strategy. But I worry that others may be too violent or numb his mind.
Scottie

Some games might improve kids' hand–eye coordination and problem-solving skills. Video games that require kids to actually move or manipulate the game through their own physical movement can even get sedentary kids moving — but not as much as if they actually played outside or participated in sports. Other games don't have such benefits, and violent video games have been shown to increase kids' aggressive behavior.

Like a lot of aspects of raising kids, when it comes to video games, the healthiest approach is moderation.

For kids and teens 5 to 18 years, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents place consistent limits on time spent using any media. This includes playing video games on gaming consoles, tablets, or smartphones. Using media should not take the place of getting enough sleep or being physically active. So consider setting limits to keep game-playing from interfering with schoolwork, household chores, and the physical activity your son needs every day.

Also, make sure that your son is playing games suitable for his age group. All video games are rated and labeled by the Entertainment Software Rating Board. Steer clear of any rated "M" for "mature." Those are for ages 17 and older, and can contain heavy-duty violence, strong language, and sexual content.

Keep the video game console in a common area of the house, not your son's room. That way you can catch any inappropriate content in the games he's playing, and he'll be in a position to interact with others in the house while he's playing. Also pay attention to time spent playing games on smartphones and tablets.

Make sure your son has other appealing choices: sports, activities, chances to socialize with friends, and downtime to be creative. If you continue to have concerns about his video game activity, talk with your doctor.

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Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995-2019 KidsHealth®. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Veer, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com.

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