Today my son fell at the playground and broke his arm. How long will the bone take to heal?
Debra

Broken bones have an amazing ability to heal, especially in children. New bone forms within a few weeks of the injury, although full healing can take longer.

Your son's arm was probably put in a cast or splint. Casts and splints hold broken bones in place as they heal. Be sure to take care of the cast or splint so that it stays in good condition and doesn't cause skin irritation.

A broken bone is a common, treatable childhood injury. Most breaks heal well. Within a few months, kids usually are back to all the activities they enjoyed before the broken bone.

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Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995-2020 KidsHealth®. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Veer, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com.

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